Preview: DUO CHAKARYAN. Gliere and Kodaly

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Starring: Miro Chakaryan; Susan Mouton

DUO CHAKARYAN
Miro Chakaryan (violin)
Susan Mouton (cello)

Prelude for Violin & Cello
Reinholdt Glière (1874 - 1956)
Duo, Op. 7 for Violin and Cello
Zoltán Kodály (1882-1967)
The husband and wife team, Susan Mouton & Miro Chakaryan are musicians who both have major careers in classical music in SA, as solo performers, chamber musicians, orchestral players and freelance recording artists. Susan also regularly features playing in cabaret with SA singers like Jannie du Toit.

They have both performed in productions for Artmusic.TV.
This production is a single camera shot with excellent sound by BEYOND SOUND.

PROGRAMME NOTES by Willard J. Herz (below) provides a scholarly insight
into the main work on the programme.

Kodály composed the Duo for Violin and Cello in 1914 at the height of his interest in Hungarian folk music, and the work reflects that interest. Folk elements and idioms abound – for example, the use of five-tone scales and early modal church scales, abrupt changes in mood, extravagant ornamentation, and long rhapsodic passages as if the instruments were telling a story or reciting a poem. You might imagine yourself in the square of a Hungarian village on a summer evening listening to the local fiddler and cellist extemporize – except that the music demands virtuoso technical skills far beyond the average village musician.
The first movement is in conventional sonata form. The second movement introduces a mood of despair – Kodály’s biographer László Eösze speculates that it may reflect the composer’s sense of foreboding on the imminence of World War I.

The third movement opens with a long and highly rhapsodic solo for the violin. The music then breaks into a series of highly accented dances, played at a presto pace. To this listener, however, the feeling of sadness carries over from the preceding movement, and the emphatic chords ending the work underscore the composer’s depressed mood.